Newborn

Newborn Poop Frequency: What’s Normal and What’s Not?

Poop says a lot about our babies’ health. They can be an indication if your baby’s jaundice level is at an alarming rate, for example. Constipation is also a symptom of a number of conditions they may be suffering from.

As a first time parent, you simply don’t know how to gauge your baby’s poop, what’s normal and what’s not. Should you be alarmed that they’re pooping a lot more than last week? How long should you wait until you can say that your baby is constipated?

These are the questions we’re going to answer in this article.

How often should a newborn poop?

You will see your baby’s first poop right after birth. But parents, don’t be shocked to find poop as black as Palpatine’s soul in your baby’s diaper.

It’s normal and we call it meconium. It mainly contains materials that the baby had ingested while still in the mother’s womb. It includes amniotic fluid and skin cells. Take note that meconium doesn’t smell so don’t rely on your nose when judging whether or not it’s time to change already.

Your baby’s poop will become lighter in color starting the first week and you should expect to change diapers up to 10 times per day. Yes, that frequent. Babies at this age tend to feed often and because breastmilk can be digested very easily, they poop a lot.

Newborn poop frequency will gradually lessen over the next few weeks. By the 6th week, breastfed babies will poop less than once a day.

What’s not normal?

Ultimately, it will vary from child to child. There’s no universal definite guide as to how often they perform bowel movement. However, you should consult the doctor if you notice that your baby is constipated. You’ll know this if they poop less than once a week.

Another indication that there may be something wrong is if their poop is hard. Generally, baby’s poop consistency shouldn’t be harder than food pastes such as peanut butter. If it gets harder than that, it’s possible that you’re dealing with newborn constipation.

If you can see blood in your baby’s poop, consult your doctor immediately. It could be a symptom of bacterial infection, allergies, or hemorrhoids in babies. Aside from these, it should be normal.

Facebook Comments

Write A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.